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5 amazing facts about Abdul Qadeer Khan

5 Facts of Dr. A.Q Khan’s Life which you need to know

The world’s most prolific nuclear scientist, Dr. A.Q Khan, is often called the Father of Pakistan’s Bomb. However, his life is filled with ups and downs that are not just interesting but also inspirational. For example, he was imprisoned in France for nine years for selling nuclear secrets to other countries without any political motive. But despite the many obstacles he faced in his life, he never stopped believing in himself and always strived to do something great for humanity. Read on to learn about 5 amazing facts about this man you probably didn’t know!

 

 5 amazing facts about Abdul Qadeer Khan

 

Abdul Qadeer Khan (born 19 April 1936) is a Pakistani physicist and a metallurgical engineer. He is known as father of Pakistan’s nuclear programme, and along with his countryman Salim Mehmud, he is regarded as one of the pioneers of the country’s engineering and science infrastructure.Born in Rawalpindi, then East Pakistan, he spent much of his childhood in Malaysia. Once, while the family took a road trip to Sumatra, the government officials there took offense to his detention and ordered his deportation. As someone who was an American citizen, Khan applied for and received American citizenship in 1970.

Unable to gain entry to the United States due to the Vietnam War, he travelled to Europe and eventually settled in Paris, working at a research institute on the French radiology department. However, circumstances did not go as planned and Khan did not receive his American passport for two years. In 1973, driven by a pressing need to better understand France’s nuclear programme, Khan moved to France.

Passing two exams in French and English, and knowing no one in the country, he decided to study at the Ecole Centrale, working under the radar. He graduated in 1975, and then proceeded to obtain a Master’s Degree in Geology. Two years later, he became the head of France’s atomic energy agency and a professor at the CNRS.

Soon after, in 1979, Khan became aware of media coverage of a protracted legal dispute between the UK and France over French scientific activities at Lincoln Laboratory. Thinking this would provide a good opportunity to further his international reputation, Khan flew to London and negotiated the release of the scientists involved. Thus began his career as a strategic adviser to the French Atomic Energy Commission.

However, his career took a turn for the worse in 1983 when France briefly suspended its research cooperation with him due to outrage from the West over his alleged involvement with a UK-based Israeli spy ring during the ‘October Crisis.

 

The world’s most prolific nuclear scientist, Dr. A.Q Khan, is often called the Father of Pakistan’s Nuclear Bomb. However, his life is filled with ups and downs that are not just interesting but also inspirational. For example, he was imprisoned in France for nine years for selling nuclear secrets to other countries without any political motive. But despite the many obstacles he faced in his life, he never stopped believing in himself and always strived to do something great for humanity.

 

Read on to learn about 5 amazing facts about this man you probably didn’t know!

 

 5 amazing facts about Abdul Qadeer Khan

 

Abdul Qadeer Khan (born 19 April 1936) is a Pakistani physicist and a metallurgical engineer. He is known as father of Pakistan’s nuclear programme, and along with his countryman Salim Mehmud, he is regarded as one of the pioneers of the country’s engineering and science infrastructure.Born in Rawalpindi, then East Pakistan, he spent much of his childhood in Malaysia. Once, while the family took a road trip to Sumatra, the government officials there took offense to his detention and ordered his deportation. As someone who was an American citizen, Khan applied for and received American citizenship in 1970.Unable to gain entry to the United States due to the Vietnam War, he travelled to Europe and eventually settled in Paris, working at a research institute on the French radiology department. However, circumstances did not go as planned and Khan did not receive his American passport for two years. In 1973, driven by a pressing need to better understand France’s nuclear programme, Khan moved to France.Passing two exams in French and English, and knowing no one in the country, he decided to study at the Ecole Centrale, working under the radar. He graduated in 1975, and then proceeded to obtain a Master’s Degree in Geology. Two years later, he became the head of France’s atomic energy agency and a professor at the CNRS.Soon after, in 1979, Khan became aware of media coverage of a protracted legal dispute between the UK and France over French scientific activities at Lincoln Laboratory. Thinking this would provide a good opportunity to further his international reputation, Khan flew to London and negotiated the release of the scientists involved. Thus began his career as a strategic adviser to the French Atomic Energy Commission.However, his career took a turn for the worse in 1983 when France briefly suspended its research cooperation with him due to outrage from the West over his alleged involvement with a UK-based Israeli spy ring during the ‘October Crisis.

 

1. The story of his life from the beginning to the end

 

I was born in the city of Baku, in Azerbaijan. It’s a country that was part of the Soviet Union at the time. My father was a science-fiction writer there, and my mother was a teacher. They were very young when they had me, so they decided to move to the United States so that I could have a better life there.The Khan’s settled in Hawthorne, California, and my mother taught for the public school system. It was then that I learned of the existence of the Khans.It wasn’t long before I decided to continue my education in the United States to continue my education in the medical field. (…)I finished all my studies in 1985 and obtained a Bachelor’s Degree in Geology and a Master’s Degree in Sustainable Geology. In 1996, I moved to the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, winning a Fulbright Scholarship. However, I immersed myself in the medical industry, and in 1996, I started working as a consultant for the hospital. But the doctors there were not interested in my background. All they knew about was my medical degree. And they weren’t that interested in me after I graduated. However, I had a lot to celebrate.Named one of America’s top technical achievers, two fellowships, and fellowships, and a referral from MIT. I was having such a great impact that I applied for a peer-reviewed publication, and while the process dragged, my articles were accepted. My first peer-reviewed article or editorial appeared in Nature. My work was on rare diseases, and its visibility on the medical content was such that the editors were encouraging an interview. They were interested too. It was on rare diseases such as Huntington’s, Parkinson’s, and Leukemia. Condition: ataxia, which is an enzyme deficiency disorder affecting over 40,000 people in the United States. After I received that award, I was invited to speak at US and Chinese Consulates. At the end of my stint, a few Chinese publishers attracted my attention. And they called my office. I was asked to write a book about the importance of an H13 in China’s GDP, mainly because I knew everything about this subject.

 

2. His journey from a small town in Pakistan to a nuclear physicist

 

After graduating from high school, Ashar went on to pursue his Bachelor’s in Physics from the University of Punjab. He then moved to the US to pursue his Masters in Physics from the University of Texas at Dallas. After getting his Master’s degree, Ashar started a Ph.D.program at Virginia Tech, and eventually became Associate Professor in the School of Energy and Applied Science.Ashar has maintained a consistent presence in the US intelligence community and is frequently exposed to high-level policymakers from both parties’ intelligence agencies. While in the US military, he rose to become an astronaut and was assigned to research projects involving the development of the interplanetary mission and long-term space exploration.When he is not writing on the space exploration front, he enjoys watching football and basketball. His life and work have transformed greatly in the last several years, though, rumours still swirl about his controversial past. To this day, there are rumors that the CIA believes he has been helping to plan the Osama Bin Laden letter bomb attack.2. 5 amazing facts about Abdul Qadeer KhanThis list is excerpted from a larger, bio-graphical article. Khan’s most amazing moment in life came in 1978, when he boarded a plane to travel to Seattle, becoming just the fifth non-European to set foot on American soil. As a nod to the recent Nobel Peace Prize controversy, he was actively involved in a US presidential election campaign to unseat Governor George Deukmejian. Though it was voted down, his political theory had enormous support and he received the largest number of votes in a California legislative race since Eisenhower had received 11 years earlier. For many weeks leading up to the election, Khan was simply a guest at Democratic Party functions, but as the results began to come in he suddenly became a figurehead at the Capitol in Sacramento, the state capital. Khan rushed to the podium, making a speech shortly after Governor Reagan’s inauguration that became the most-heard word in the Statehouse that day. For many political scientists, this alone represented the dawn of a new era.

 

3. The story of how he built Pakistan’s first atomic bomb

 

I am a big fan of Benoit Mandelbrot — also known as the father of fractal geometry — and his work.As a result, when the world realised they were collateral damage in the October Crisis, a campaign was started to have him prosecuted, which led to the resignation of the President Chirac in 1990.Meanwhile, Khan began to realise that a reputation for being a ‘rogue professor’ could not continue forever and a change in policy was needed. It was at this time that he began to get involved in philanthropy. In 1996, he founded the World Congressionally Fund for Climate Change (WCF), a green-based international organisation based in New York. It has since become one of the most prominent non-profit environmentalism organisations and is one of the two largest investors in the United States.Though he once told the Washington Post that he expected little financial return for his efforts since he neither wanted nor needed money, he now regards philanthropy as his “second mother” and makes his living through it, using his knowledge of computer science and public policy to help save the world’s poor and marginalised people.2. 43 Nobel Prizes and 19 honorary doctoratesDr. Khan’s amazing achievements have earned him the nickname “father of the nation” and many influential positions in the United Nations and the world community, including: President of the World Bank; President of its governing body, the International Bank of Development, President of the World Economic Forum (WIFE); appointed Chairman of the advisory board of the Harvard professor’s Centre for Climate Change and Environmental Justice; adviser to several world summits; appointed one of the advisors to the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals; Dr. Wilson chair of the Australian Human Rights Commission; and member of several international commissions, including the UN Environment Program; and the Financial Resolution Authority ‘science adviser’ to the UN Environment Program, and the UN Environment Program’s Consultant to the Secretary General.

 

4. How he helped Iran, Iraq and North Korea build their own nuclear weapons

 

Ben Rhodes is the Deputy National Security Advisor for Strategic Communications and Speechwriting for the Obama administration. He is known for working on the Iran deal.Dr. Khan later stated, “It was Penguin [Rhodes] who saved my career. He gave me the freedom to come back to the US. Although his energy agency had done me a great service, I could not forgive him for siding with the British.”2. He helped save the lives of hundreds of scientists and scientists assistantsThrough the support of the US government, Khan’s team was granted visas to export nuclear material to Pakistan and came up with a new British-designed bomb called the Reactor Project 6. The Reactor Project 6 was classified as a new and different type of bomb, with nuclear physicist Dr. Khan as both the designer and the main experimental physicist, and it was intended to be the most powerful and reliable nuclear-using device ever built.However, due to technical difficulties in cross-contamination, precious parts, such as the bomb casings for fission components, would need to be shipped from Europe to Pakistan en masse by rail to be installed in a huge new plant in the Pakistani city of Qandah. Due to Khan’s foresight, serious nuclear accidents happened in September of 1987, when an accidental atomic explosion destroyed the Reactor Project 6. The next explosion would have occurred during the installation, resulting in the deaths of 40,000 people.3. Khan was an international society leader both in academic and government circlesMany of his academic papers are in journals ranging from physics, medicine, biology, biology, chemistry, and immunology, but he has also been NASA’s scientific adviser for the Earth Sciences mission review committee, receiving NASA’s Presidential Award for Exceptional Service to the Nation. His research has been featured in national newspapers internationally. He received several Canadian, American, and European honors, as well as the President of France’s Academy of Sciences.

 

5. How he was caught by international intelligence agencies and put in prison for nine years

 

When he was 14, he was caught by international intelligence agencies and put in prison for nine years. While in prison, he had to eat bugs, snakes, and rats to survive. He was freed after the prison was liberated.After being released from prison and shunned by most universities, Khan studied at the Paris Nanterre Polytechnique and went on to do nuclear research for the French government. He is currently Europe’s leading expert on small irradiation and controlled nuclear explosions.2. 5 facts about Dr. KhanDr. A.Q. Khan is the father of a nation. He is the grandfather of India’s first space scientist, Professor Nahid Afkham. He founded the first power plant in Pakistan. He designed a nuclear weapon for the Pakistani military. He helped plan the 2003 test. In 1989, he appeared in the fictional ‘Balibonesque’ segment of the opening sequence of ‘Men in Black II’ which was a science fiction film. He’s researched fluid dynamics, nuclear physics, liquid, and the development of nuclear weapons.Dr Khan is a philanthropist. He was a 2006 World Community Trust wishmaker. (NSFW)3. 5 amazing facts about A.Q.

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